Case Studies/Studies

Injured Children Show Marked Increase in Mental Health Diagnoses

Children who are hospitalized for injuries may subsequently be more likely to be diagnosed with mental health issues, recent research suggests.


Physician Suicide Rate Surpasses That of General Population

Physicians commit suicide at more than twice the rate of the general population — 28-40 per 100,000 versus about 12 per 100,000 — according to research presented at a meeting of the American Psychiatric Association and reported in Medscape Medical News.


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Detection of Failing Shunts in Hydrocephalus Patients

Researchers at Northwestern University have developed a bandage-like sensor to quickly and noninvasively detect malfunctions in implanted shunts used to drain excess fluid from the brains of hydrocephalus patients.

Almost all such...


Meta-Analysis: As Smoking Increases, So Does Atrial Fibrillation Risk

Risk for atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder, increases with every cigarette a person smokes per day, according to a meta-analysis of nearly 30 prospective studies.


Trending in 2019: Medical Costs Likely to Keep Climbing

The U.S. healthcare system has long offered some of the most sophisticated and effective care available, But success comes with rising costs. Those increases do not appear to be over.


Mothers of Infants with Heart Defects Face Elevated Cardiovascular Risk Later, Researchers Find

Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects (CHD) have a greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life than women whose babies do not have CHD, a Canadian study found.


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Cardiologist Care Linked to Lower AFib Death Rate

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) patients who receive care from a cardiologist are about 32 percent less likely to die within the first year after initial diagnosis, a study published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology found.

However, it...


Stimulation Aids Spinal Cord Injury Patients’ Bladder Control

Five men with spinal cord injuries that impaired the ability to voluntarily urinate gained improved bladder control as well as average quality-of-life improvement of 60 percent after lower-spinal-cord stimulation, according to a study in Scientific Reports.


GERD Associated with Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancers in Older Adults

Researchers in Louisiana have linked GERD with the development of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers in elderly individuals, but causality remains elusive.


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Fiber Takes on Stress

Greater fiber intake may reduce stress by increasing production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), a study by Irish researchers found.

Gut bacteria produce SCFAs, and high-fiber foods stimulate that process, according to a news release about the findings. Feeding...